Category: Uncategorized (Page 3 of 286)

Enrichment Activities for Writers: Day 14

Enrichment Activities:
30 Days of Stay-at-Home Learning, Business,
and Self-Care Activities for Writers

Fiction writer?

Home?

Bored?

Thinking that you should be getting some writing done but somehow not getting anywhere with that?

First, let me recommend that you take it easy on yourself.

Second, have I got some ideas for you!

If you’re spinning your wheels and want someone to give you the equivalent of a small arts and crafts kit for fiction writing, have I got some suggestions for you.

As a ten-year ghostwriting freelancer, I have been disciplining myself to stay on track and focused for quite some time. I’ve learned some tricks on the business side, and I’m a positive fiend for studying new techniques.

Want to steal some of that? Follow this blog for the next month, and you’ll have 30 different story starts, 30 different journal entries to mine for content, 30 different fiction techiques to add to your toolbox, and lots, lot more.

And best of all? While it’s on the blog, it’ll be free.

Da Rules 

  • The business tip should take you no longer than 10 minutes; if it takes you longer, put it on your to-do list for later (unless you actually feel like doing it).
  • Study projects: literally type in the first 250-500 words (as you like) of the opening of the book, not counting any introductions, prefaces, or quotes, unless it’s part of the book. However you normally type your fiction, do that. If you hand-write fiction, you can hand-write the study projects, but stay on the low end.
  • Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way has excellent advice on how to journal. She recommends 3 pages in a spiral-bound notebook. I advise to go for a minimum of 1 page spiral bound or 250-500 words typed.
  • Short writing topics: You can do more than 3 sentences. Stop when you feel like stopping. This is just to try something new.
  • Staying human: If you’re going to pick one thing to do every day, hydrate!
  • Fun with research: it’s best to do your own Internet searches, but I’ve provided a fun link to get started with.

My choices across the board reflect my own personal preferences, not any kind of absolute wisdom. This is a rapid prototype, not a well-thought-out plan of development for fiction writers!

The idea for this project came from a voice chat with some members of the Colorado Tesla Writers Group, who expressed that they were having trouble staying motivated to write.

DAY 14

Business Tip

Pick one task from your “to do someday” list and do an Internet search for how to do that thing. Don’t do it yet, unless it would take less than 10 minutes.

Short Study Project

Type in the first page of Generation Loss by Elizabeth Hand. Highlight any elements that seem to hint at rhythm. (Hint: look at the lengths of paragraphs, sentences, and words.) If the first page were the opening of a song, what kind of song would it be? (Use the free Amazon sample!)

Journal Topic

Write one page or less about your favorite song. Is it slow or fast? Is it melodic, lyrical, or rhythmic? What do you like best about it? How long is it? What is the beginning like? Why do you like it?

Short Writing Topic

Write 3 sentences or less about a setting (not a character!) that feels like the opening of that song.

Staying Human

Find a social media group for writers and join it!

Fun with Research

What is the first rock and roll band? (The answer is more complicated than you might think!)

If you enjoy these posts, please consider signing up for my newsletter or for my writing-craft project on Patreon. Thanks!

Enrichment Activities for Writers: Day 13

Enrichment Activities:
30 Days of Stay-at-Home Learning, Business,
and Self-Care Activities for Writers

Fiction writer?

Home?

Bored?

Thinking that you should be getting some writing done but somehow not getting anywhere with that?

First, let me recommend that you take it easy on yourself.

Second, have I got some ideas for you!

If you’re spinning your wheels and want someone to give you the equivalent of a small arts and crafts kit for fiction writing, have I got some suggestions for you.

As a ten-year ghostwriting freelancer, I have been disciplining myself to stay on track and focused for quite some time. I’ve learned some tricks on the business side, and I’m a positive fiend for studying new techniques.

Want to steal some of that? Follow this blog for the next month, and you’ll have 30 different story starts, 30 different journal entries to mine for content, 30 different fiction techiques to add to your toolbox, and lots, lot more.

And best of all? While it’s on the blog, it’ll be free.

Da Rules 

  • The business tip should take you no longer than 10 minutes; if it takes you longer, put it on your to-do list for later (unless you actually feel like doing it).
  • Study projects: literally type in the first 250-500 words (as you like) of the opening of the book, not counting any introductions, prefaces, or quotes, unless it’s part of the book. However you normally type your fiction, do that. If you hand-write fiction, you can hand-write the study projects, but stay on the low end.
  • Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way has excellent advice on how to journal. She recommends 3 pages in a spiral-bound notebook. I advise to go for a minimum of 1 page spiral bound or 250-500 words typed.
  • Short writing topics: You can do more than 3 sentences. Stop when you feel like stopping. This is just to try something new.
  • Staying human: If you’re going to pick one thing to do every day, hydrate!
  • Fun with research: it’s best to do your own Internet searches, but I’ve provided a fun link to get started with.

My choices across the board reflect my own personal preferences, not any kind of absolute wisdom. This is a rapid prototype, not a well-thought-out plan of development for fiction writers!

The idea for this project came from a voice chat with some members of the Colorado Tesla Writers Group, who expressed that they were having trouble staying motivated to write.

DAY 13

Business Tip

If you could no longer write in your favorite genre, what completely different genre would other people say you should write in?

Short Study Project

Type in the first page of the most popular book in the genre other people might pick for you. Highlight elements that you think “fit” with the way you see the world. (Use the free Amazon sample!)

Journal Topic

Write one page or less about what made you start reading in your favorite genre, and whether that still applies. Have your tastes matured or changed?

Short Writing Topic

Write 3 sentences about a character who doesn’t read your genre, but gets dragged into a story from your genre. (A Western reader drawn into a modern romance, etc.)

Staying Human

Clean off your desk! And make sure your monitor screen is finally cleaned 🙂

Fun with Research

Find a best-books-of-all-time list in this other genre, and plan to read one of the books you haven’t read before!

If you enjoy these posts, please consider signing up for my newsletter or for my writing-craft project on Patreon. Thanks!

Writing Craft: Negotiations

(This is a sample from my writing craft series; you can read more on Patreon. Please note that these first posts are about things that aren’t strictly about the craft of writing, but the craft of surviving as a writer, if you will, because I want to get them out of the way first.)

Negotiations 

The specifics of negotiation (which include contracts and other legal matters I’m not qualified to talk about) are involved, tricky, and beyond the scope of this book. The generalities are pretty simple, though.

  • You want something, and can provide something else.
  • The other side wants what you can provide, and can provide you what you want.
  • Both sides should benefit, receiving fair recompense for what they provide.

Writers at all levels tend to get into situations where they provide something of great value (original creative work) for which they are then paid less than what it is worth, while giving more or less complete control to the other party, more or less for the life of the copyright of the piece, without an real legal protection.

I strongly recommend reading The Copyright Handbook from Nolo Press before you embark further on your publishing adventures. I probably won’t stop strongly recommending you do so, either.

You’ll have to consult other sources in order to get the specifics of what you should negotiate for, what constitute the situation’s specific red flags, and what you should absolutely, positively, never do.

But the essence of negotiation—a template, if you will—goes like this:

  • Don’t pre-negotiate. Don’t compromise before you even start.
  • State what you want.
  • Acknowledge the other party’s point of view.
  • State your point of view.
  • Re-state what you want.
  • Know, beforehand, what will make you walk away from the deal, and be prepared to walk.

That’s it.

(Click here for examples and more information on negotiation, and another section on apologies, including ones where you didn’t think you did anything wrong…)

Enrichment Activities for Writers: Day 3

Enrichment Activities:
30 Days of Stay-at-Home Learning, Business,
and Self-Care Activities for Writers

Fiction writer?

Home?

Bored?

Thinking that you should be getting some writing done but somehow not getting anywhere with that?

First, let me recommend that you take it easy on yourself.

Second, have I got some ideas for you!

If you’re spinning your wheels and want someone to give you the equivalent of a small arts and crafts kit for fiction writing, have I got some suggestions for you.

As a ten-year ghostwriting freelancer, I have been disciplining myself to stay on track and focused for quite some time. I’ve learned some tricks on the business side, and I’m a positive fiend for studying new techniques.

Want to steal some of that? Follow this blog for the next month, and you’ll have 30 different story starts, 30 different journal entries to mine for content, 30 different fiction techiques to add to your toolbox, and lots, lot more.

And best of all? While it’s on the blog, it’ll be free.

Da Rules 

  • The business tip should take you no longer than 10 minutes; if it takes you longer, put it on your to-do list for later (unless you actually feel like doing it).
  • Study projects: literally type in the first 250-500 words (as you like) of the opening of the book, not counting any introductions, prefaces, or quotes, unless it’s part of the book. However you normally type your fiction, do that. If you hand-write fiction, you can hand-write the study projects, but stay on the low end.
  • Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way has excellent advice on how to journal. She recommends 3 pages in a spiral-bound notebook. I advise to go for a minimum of 1 page spiral bound or 250-500 words typed.
  • Short writing topics: You can do more than 3 sentences. Stop when you feel like stopping. This is just to try something new.
  • Staying human: If you’re going to pick one thing to do every day, hydrate!
  • Fun with research: it’s best to do your own Internet searches, but I’ve provided a fun link to get started with.

My choices across the board reflect my own personal preferences, not any kind of absolute wisdom. This is a rapid prototype, not a well-thought-out plan of development for fiction writers!

The idea for this project came from a voice chat with some members of the Colorado Tesla Writers Group, who expressed that they were having trouble staying motivated to write.

DAY 3

Business Tip

Think like an artist! Pick out your best five pieces of written work, whether published or otherwise, as the beginning of your writing portfolio. All the pieces must be either published or final, in standard manuscript format.

Short Study Project

Type in the first page of The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler. Highlight every element that describes a current, future, or past situation/problem at hand, either directly or indirectly. (Use the free Amazon sample!)

Journal Topic

Write one page or less about a problem that you overcame in the past and whether it has, directly or indirectly, come back to haunt you.

Short Writing Topic

Write 3 sentences about a character named Phil/Pippa who has the same problem and is in denial about it coming back to haunt them. (You can write more if you’re inspired!)

Staying Human

Breathe ten breaths slowly in and out after you send each email.

Fun with Research

Take a few minutes to watch some lockpicking videos online. I particularly recommend the Lockpicking Lawyer on YouTube.

If you enjoy these posts, please consider signing up for my newsletter or for my writing-craft project on Patreon. Thanks!

Enrichment Activities for Writers: Day 2

Enrichment Activities:
30 Days of Stay-at-Home Learning, Business,
and Self-Care Activities for Writers

Fiction writer?

Home?

Bored?

Thinking that you should be getting some writing done but somehow not getting anywhere with that?

First, let me recommend that you take it easy on yourself.

Second, have I got some ideas for you!

If you’re spinning your wheels and want someone to give you the equivalent of a small arts and crafts kit for fiction writing, have I got some suggestions for you.

As a ten-year ghostwriting freelancer, I have been disciplining myself to stay on track and focused for quite some time. I’ve learned some tricks on the business side, and I’m a positive fiend for studying new techniques.

Want to steal some of that? Follow this blog for the next month, and you’ll have 30 different story starts, 30 different journal entries to mine for content, 30 different fiction techiques to add to your toolbox, and lots, lot more.

And best of all? While it’s on the blog, it’ll be free.

Da Rules 

  • The business tip should take you no longer than 10 minutes; if it takes you longer, put it on your to-do list for later (unless you actually feel like doing it).
  • Study projects: literally type in the first 250-500 words (as you like) of the opening of the book, not counting any introductions, prefaces, or quotes, unless it’s part of the book. However you normally type your fiction, do that. If you hand-write fiction, you can hand-write the study projects, but stay on the low end.
  • Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way has excellent advice on how to journal. She recommends 3 pages in a spiral-bound notebook. I advise to go for a minimum of 1 page spiral bound or 250-500 words typed.
  • Short writing topics: You can do more than 3 sentences. Stop when you feel like stopping. This is just to try something new.
  • Staying human: If you’re going to pick one thing to do every day, hydrate!
  • Fun with research: it’s best to do your own Internet searches, but I’ve provided a fun link to get started with.

My choices across the board reflect my own personal preferences, not any kind of absolute wisdom. This is a rapid prototype, not a well-thought-out plan of development for fiction writers!

The idea for this project came from a voice chat with some members of the Colorado Tesla Writers Group, who expressed that they were having trouble staying motivated to write.

DAY 2

Business Tip

Start a writing to-do list with two sections: “to do soon” and “to do someday.” Whenever you find something that’s not done yet or that took you more than 10 minutes to finish, add it to this list! Schedule a reminder 3 months from now to review this list.

Short Study Project

Type in the first page of White Teeth by Zadie Smith. Highlight every element that describes the setting (time, place, and atmosphere), either directly or indirectly. (Use the free Amazon sample!)

Journal Topic

Write one page or less about a setting you disliked from when you were a teenager. Make sure to describe the time, place, and atmosphere.

Short Writing Topic

Write 3 sentences about how a character named Art/Arta returns to that same scene, 20 years later. (You can write more if you’re inspired!)

Staying Human

Step away from your computer to eat at least one meal. You can read a book while you eat–but don’t sit at your desk to do it!

Fun with Research

Look up the Tianzi Mountains of China, the remarkable rock formations that are responsible for many stunning fantasy-world locations.

If you enjoy these posts, please consider signing up for my newsletter or for my writing-craft project on Patreon. Thanks!

Enrichment Activities for Writers: Day 1

Enrichment Activities:
30 Days of Stay-at-Home Learning, Business,
and Self-Care Activities for Writers

Fiction writer?

Home?

Bored?

Thinking that you should be getting some writing done but somehow not getting anywhere with that?

First, let me recommend that you take it easy on yourself.

Second, have I got some ideas for you!

If you’re spinning your wheels and want someone to give you the equivalent of a small arts and crafts kit for fiction writing, have I got some suggestions for you.

As a ten-year ghostwriting freelancer, I have been disciplining myself to stay on track and focused for quite some time. I’ve learned some tricks on the business side, and I’m a positive fiend for studying new techniques.

Want to steal some of that? Follow this blog for the next month, and you’ll have 30 different story starts, 30 different journal entries to mine for content, 30 different fiction techiques to add to your toolbox, and lots, lot more.

And best of all? While it’s on the blog, it’ll be free.

Da Rules 

  • The business tip should take you no longer than 10 minutes; if it takes you longer, put it on your to-do list for later (unless you actually feel like doing it).
  • Study projects: literally type in the first 250-500 words (as you like) of the opening of the book, not counting any introductions, prefaces, or quotes, unless it’s part of the book. However you normally type your fiction, do that. If you hand-write fiction, you can hand-write the study projects, but stay on the low end.
  • Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way has excellent advice on how to journal. She recommends 3 pages in a spiral-bound notebook. I advise to go for a minimum of 1 page spiral bound or 250-500 words typed.
  • Short writing topics: You can do more than 3 sentences. Stop when you feel like stopping. This is just to try something new.
  • Staying human: If you’re going to pick one thing to do every day, hydrate!
  • Fun with research: it’s best to do your own Internet searches, but I’ve provided a fun link to get started with.

My choices across the board reflect my own personal preferences, not any kind of absolute wisdom. This is a rapid prototype, not a well-thought-out plan of development for fiction writers!

The idea for this project came from a voice chat with some members of the Colorado Tesla Writers Group, who expressed that they were having trouble staying motivated to write.

DAY 1

Business Tip

Back up your data! And please name every new version of a file with a different version number or date. Hint: a file named “final” never ends up final!

Short Study Project

Type in the first page of The Princess Bride by William S. Goldman (which starts with, “It’s still my favorite book in all the world”). Highlight every element that describes the narrator, either directly or indirectly. (Use the free Amazon sample!)

Journal Topic

Write one page or less about something you were irrationally embarrassed about when you were ten or so. No one needs to see your journals but you!

Short Writing Topic

Write 3 sentences about how a character named Billy/Billie, aged 10, was embarrassed about that same thing. (You can write more if you’re inspired!)

Staying Human

Please make sure you’re getting enough water! Before you sit down at your computer, please bring something to drink with you.

Fun with Research

Look up Salvator Fabris, one of the early fencing masters, and see his technique being used in modern times.

If you enjoy these posts, please consider signing up for my newsletter or for my writing-craft project on Patreon. Thanks!

No Blog Today!

With the shutdowns due to COVID-19 and various other real-life disruptions, I decided to just acknowledge that it wasn’t business as usual for yours truly, and do a short (but nutty) project about helping writers cope, particularly writers who weren’t used to working from home or having the time to conceive of what they do as a business.

I decided to start it April Fool’s Day, because that’s how my brain works.

More later 🙂 Please stay safe.

Writing Craft: How to write faster and more often (more burning questions!)

(This is from my writing craft series; you can read more on Patreon. Please note that these first posts are about things that aren’t strictly about the craft of writing, but the craft of surviving as a writer, if you will, because I want to get them out of the way first.)

Faster.

Believe it or not, the secret of writing faster is to not write slowly. Whatever your normal typing speed is, that’s your normal writing speed, unless you’re doing something that slows you down. You can write as fast as your fingers will carry you forward—if you don’t get in your own way.

That’s a pretty big if, though.

Most of us have been taught to distrust ourselves, our perceptions of the world, our creative natures in general, and our imagination in specific.

And, unfortunately, most of us don’t actually start out knowing how to write professional-level fiction, and are trying to assemble a working theory from first principles…while we’re making up a story.

In theory, writing fast is simple. In practice, quite hard.

The tricks of writing faster come down to forcing or fooling your brain into not noticing that it’s typing faster than it thinks it should—then measuring the speed—then telling your brain that that is the new acceptable average speed.

The meat of writing faster is learning how to write, so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel while increasing word count. We’ll cover learning how to write later in the book.

Some tricks still might help while you’re learning, though…

(Click here for tips on how to write faster, and more often!)

What Makes a Good Blog?

Blogging, in general, has overall strategies and individual tactics. I’m not going to talk about why to blog, what to blog in general (although I will touch on what to blog in particular), or how often to blog. This is just a blog on tactics. What makes a good blog? How do you sit down and write, right now, a satisfying blog post?

First: what is a blog post?

It’s not a news article; it’s not a diary entry. It is not quite a newspaper opinion piece, but it’s close: newspaper opinion pieces are much bigger in scope than your average blog. A blog ideally contains neither reasoned arguments nor ranting, although sometimes it does so.

A blog is a writer’s opinion on a topic—their thoughts, if you will.

And yet it is perfectly possible to enjoy a blog when you disagree with the opinion presented, and even if you know the facts are a bit off. And it is perfectly possible to hate a blog even when you agree with it.

A blog, then, is not merely a writer’s opinion on a topic, although without an opinion, a blog will feel flat, stiff, and uninteresting.

What makes a blog enjoyable? What makes it worthwhile?

The facts that are presented in a blog—really, even the topic of the blog itself—is more or less immaterial. It’s all about who’s writing the blog, not about what’s being written.

Your voice.

Whatever you write, however you write it, should carry your voice. But blogs especially should carry your voice.

A simple pattern for a blog is to make clear the facts or situations you want to discuss, give your opinion on them, then conclude that you’re right to do so. A perfectly good blog results.

You often see it in food-writing blogs: the recipe is explained; the author gives their opinion about how the recipe turned out, what adaptations they made to their source, and what they would do differently the next time; the author concludes that the food was eaten (victory!). Then comes the recipe, which many readers would prefer to read first.

There are other food blog patterns, like “let me tell you about my vacation, after which I cooked this thing” and semi-informative articles about food or health that seem fact-focused, but are mainly about hooking the reader with an opinion.

For an example of the latter, here’s a blog on selecting the best chickpeas at food-writing website The Kitchn: “I Tried 10 Different Cans of Chickpeas and There Was One Clear Winner.” It would seem like an informative, fact-filled piece. Several types of chickpeas are tested in various states: drained and uncooked, in hummus, roasted and crispy. In the end, one of the types of chickpeas is declared the winner.

Are the chickpeas tested in any sort of objective way? No. No metrics were mentioned. Are the chickpeas tested by a panel of experts? Also no. They were tested by “a group of testers” in a blind tasting—the same sort of situation as the taste tests between Coke and Pepsi in years of yore.

Was the blog written with an objective tone? Wow, no. It’s 675 words long. Thirteen of those words were I. Three mys. One your. Fourteen wes. Two ours. The blog is written with a personal tone, centered on the author and the testing group. About five percent of the words are personal pronouns.

Should the blog have been tested objectively, by a panel of experts, in an impersonal tone? I don’t think so; I enjoyed the blog that was there, and would have been less interested in a dry article. Will I rush out and buy the recommended brand of chickpeas? No. I thought about making some hummus, though.

Mmmm, hummus.

When reading the article, you might not notice that it’s written from an opinionated position. A journalist would notice, of course. But an average reader would probably not do so—unless they didn’t like the tone of the blog, or they disagreed with the opinion. Most people will simply be drawn along by the piece. It’s a solid piece, although not exceptional: the most action you’re likely to be inspired to do is to stop and think about food in general, chickpeas in particular, perhaps a specific chickpea brand or two, and wish that you had more time to cook—or feel proud that you were taking the time to cook.

However, the blog doesn’t contain a lot of personality, a lot of the author’s voice. You get a sense that you know someone has written the piece; it wasn’t generated by a computer. But who wrote the piece isn’t clear: they like chickpeas and would prefer their chickpeas to have a reasonably good quality. More than that is difficult to guess. And, for what the piece is meant to do, that is sufficient.

What interests me in a blog is when I can get a sense of who the author is, without the author having to describe themselves.—Some authors do describe themselves, at great length, and are amusing when they do so. The Bloggess has made a career for herself in describing herself and her (mis-)adventures, things that she likes, and (yay!) things that she doesn’t.  Other authors don’t describe themselves; Seth Godin always amuses me, even though he talks about you and about generalities far more often than he talks about himself or anything so specific as to have a location, a date, or a name. Here’s a fairly typical blog: “Of course it’s a difficult problem.” He goes on to say “All the easy ones are already solved.” His blog is a bit Zen, a bit oversimplified, even a bit patronizing—but I always enjoy it, and I admire the skill with which he reveals himself without actually giving you information about himself in the blogs (although he does provide more information elsewhere).

Those are good blogs. But what about the best blogs?

I don’t know about other writers, but here’s how it works for me: my most satisfying, “best” blog posts happen when the process of writing changes my opinion of what I write. Those are the fun blogs, the ones where I learn that ancient Romans used to ward off the evil eye with flying penises. This blog is one such blog post, too. When I journaled on this topic as an early draft, I completely missed the opinionated-but-not-voicy blog posts that are the mainstay of most “informative” blogs. I went searching for a random, typical voicy foodie blog, and almost facepalmed myself. Duh.

I feel like this post only livens up when I reached the point where I stopped regurgitating what I already had in mind to write. Before that, it’s stiff and uninteresting (in my opinion). A bunch of stuffy blather. I decided to leave the opening as it was, though, so you could see the difference. At least it’s clear, and it’s not too long. I hope it’s not so offputting that people skip this blog before they get to what I consider the good parts, but—well. I couldn’t blame them if they did.

The endings of blogs are always the worst for me. I usually scroll up to the beginning and see if there’s something I can steal.—No, not this time. It bores me. I’m just going to have to come up with an ending on my own. My past self didn’t leave me any bread crumbs to find my way home.

So let me just say that I’m glad I wrote this, even if it wasn’t what I expected to have written when I started. Viva la blog!

Like what you read here? More of the same at the Wonderland Press newsletter!

 

 

 

Writing Craft: Am I even a real writer, and other burning questions.

(This is from my writing craft series; you can read more on Patreon. Please note that these first posts are about things that aren’t strictly about the craft of writing, but the craft of surviving as a writer, if you will, because I want to get them out of the way first.)

This section contains questions that I have struggled with myself, or have heard more than once from friends, colleagues, and clients. My initial list was quite long; I could write a full-length book addressing questions that writers use to distract themselves from their work.

At the heart of each question is: But I’m tired.

At the heart of each answer is: I know. Give yourself a break, but don’t give up.

  1. Am I even a real writer?

If you are reading this book at all, you are likely a natural storyteller who enjoys stories in general, and, further, enjoys immersing yourself in your own stories, whether written or merely daydreamed. Asking “Am I even a real writer?” is neither useful nor appropriate. You are already marked, blessed, or cursed with a tendency to make up stories, and it is unlikely that you can remove that tendency. You can only bury it, at which point it will, like many repressed talents and emotions, cause you to make a complete ass of yourself on a regular basis.

If you don’t create something, no matter how bad it is, you’ll probably end up self-destructive, depressed, a burden upon those who love you, and an annoyance to those who don’t.

My advice is to buy the fancy journal and the too-expensive pen, and use those tools to write complete trash. You, and the world, will be better for it, even if none of your writing ever sees the light of day.

If you need it, you have my permission to write poorly, with no success or recognition whatsoever, upon whatever self-indulgent daydream suits you best.

Your writing is probably not as bad, or as good, as you think.

(Continued here.)

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