Please understand that I didn’t catch every word, so this is more the “flavor” of the answers than exact quotes. My comments are in [brackets]. Any errors are mine alone 🙂

Q: Is there are maket for alternative-lifestyle romances?

AK: I have one that’s taken over two years. But it’s a good market. It’s got to be different. [YT — the woman asking the question said, “Oh, it’s different” and we cracked up.]

Q: What’s a successful day for you?

SB: When I get a call saying, “We want to publish your book.”

Q: Where will the industry be in five to ten years with regards to the Internet?

AK: I love my books. I want to fall asleep with it on my chest. “Just read it on the Internet?” No, no.

SB: I think there will always be paper books. Publishers are trying to become more savvy on marketing via the Internet, though. Maybe not as many copies of a given title will be published on paper.

Q: Earlier you were talking about “one shot” with an editor. Can you clarify?

SB: You have one shot with the house. You need to find the right imprint and the right editor. It used to not be like that. Then Random House bought everybody. All the agents said, “How are we going to sell projects?” So now Random House has rules. Simon and Schuster and Harper have their own rules. Within an imprint, you absolutely have only one shot. If editors share an editorial board? Then the answer is no.

Q: If I’m planning to submit something to the PPW contest, should I still submit the book to an agent?

Beth: Call the contest. We can pull the entry if you get published! Can we have one last question?

AK: I’ve been lucky in finding a senior editor over all the imprints at a publishing house. When I pitch him a book, he can tell me who to send it to.

Q: When you’re selling a nonfiction book, do you send the proposal or make a verbal pitch?

SB: I send the proposal. I never do a verbal.

Prizes: one copy of Self-Editing for Writers. One deck of cards from Ellora’s Cave, an erotica publisher. “Fun!” exclaims Beth.

The End 🙂