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Five Excellent Weird Fiction Novels in Translation

Now You're One of Us, from Five Weird Fiction Novels in Translation
Now You’re One of Us, by Asa Nonami, translated by Mitsuko Volek

Tired of reading the same plots by the same types of authors? Need a palate cleanser? Want to interject new life into a reading group that thinks The Help is a controversial title?

Looking for an author that can really describe the unsettling, creepy feeling of not knowing whether the people around you mean well or not? Of not knowing whether the things your soul craves most are good for you or not? Of not knowing whether your craving to belong will help you—or hurt you?

If so, I have some lovely, dark, and wonderful weird fiction novels in translation for you!

I tried to organize this list in order of shorter, easier reads that might lead to book club discussion, to more complex reads that require time to unfold.

1. Now You’re One of Us, by Asa Nonami (Japan), translated by Michael Volek.

Now You’re One of Us is the tale of an upper-class Japanese family gone wrong. So wrong. This book is like a combination of Liane Moriarty (Big Little Lies, The Husband’s Secret) and an instruction novel on how to run a profitable family cult. While other books on this list are weird and surreal, this book is weird and juicy, scratching the itch for scandal in a way that’s so over the top that it becomes almost a satire.

2. The Vegetarian, by Han Kang (South Korea), translated by Deborah Smith.

The Vegetarian is the tale of a woman who, against her family’s wishes, decides to stop eating meat, after a series of sensual nightmares leads her to worry about the darker side of her nature. The strongly feminist story feels like a combination of Franz Kafka and Virginia Woolf. It’s short, and written in a clear, direct style that lends itself to book club mischief.

3. Amatka, by Karin Tidbeck (Sweden), translated by the author.

A marketing researcher in personal hygiene products travels to a farming community, Amatka, to see whether any of the products they make can be used in her home town. However, Amatka mainly farms fungus products that turn into goop if they aren’t properly cared for. Another short book that is clearly and directly written—deliberately so, in a way that becomes horrifying as the story progresses. The story reads like a combination of 1984 and Stanislaw Lem’s alien novel Solaris.

4. The Memory Police, by Y?ko Ogawa (Japan), translated by Stephen Snyder.

Unlike a lot of weird fiction, which can be skimpy on descriptions, this book is invested in incredible details. It feels like the difference between a concrete bunker and a Miyazaki movie like Spirited Away. However, because this is a book about how remembering the wrong things can cost you, the details serve to increase the tension of the book. I recommend this one if you liked Japanese classics by filmmaker Akira Kurosawa. It feels like his kind of story, zooming in on the small details and exploring conflicting points of view.

5. Kalpa Imperial: The Greatest Empire that Never Was, by Angélica Gorodisher (Argentina), translated by Ursula K. LeGuin

This book is more challenging than the previous two, more complex, and less direct and clear in its writing (and translation). It’s also more of a mouthful, something to savor and consider, and enjoy reading just for the pleasure of seeing the author and translator turn a phrase. The book is the history of an unnamed empire over its various ages, seen from after its fall, and from another country. (“Kalpa” means “aeon” in Sanskrit; the title loosely translates to “The time between the creation and recreation of an empire.”) I don’t recommend this one for your book club; it’s book more meant for leisure reading. There’s a twist to the book that slowly becomes apparent toward the end. Read this if you like Ursula K. LeGuin’s books or Gene Wolfe’s Solar Cycle.

Bonus Book:  The Complete Stories of Leonora Carrington (Mexico), translated by Katherine Talbot, Anthony Kerrigan, and Marina Warner.

Leonora Carrington was a surrealist writer and painter who wrote short fable-like stories for adults and children as strange as anything Salvador Dalí ever painted (or wrote). Each story seems, at first glance, to have been sloppily tossed together, but in a way that makes perfect sense and never wastes a word. I found myself reading these tales not so much for their meaning (there is meaning!), but as a sort of brain-refresher, clearing out the daily dust that had gathered in my brain. Read these if you like Dalí or Frieda Kahlo.

If you’re interested in weird fiction written by yours truly, check out The House Without a Summer, describing what happens when an asshole gets his hands on the spacetime continuum. It’s set in England in the year 1816, the real-life year without a summer (and the year that Frankenstein was written). It has not yet been translated out of English, but I promise you it’s off the beaten path! I recommend it if you liked Black Tom by Victor Lavalle or The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead. You can find out more about it here.

And now you must excuse me; it’s time for me to read the next book on my weird fiction novels in translation list, Flowers of Mold by Ha Seong-nan. I’ll let you know if it’s good.

New Short Horror Story Release: Trick or Treat (Tenebrosities #4)

Short horror story: Trick or Treat

Universal Sales Link | Goodreads

Release #4 in the short horror story, Twilight-Zone-esque Tenebrosities series, “Trick or Treat,” is available now. I originally wrote this in 2012, but rewrote it this month to rescue it–I just liked the story and characters too much to completely blow it off 🙂

You can find it here:

books2read.com/tenebrosities-trick-or-treat

What’s the matter, Jake? Chicken?

It’s Halloween. Just over a month ago, Jake’s brother Dave died in Afghanistan, killed by an IED bomb. Now Jake is going trick or treating, dressed like a solder. Dressed like his brother.

He decides to take the same route that he and his brother took, cutting through a junkyard, walking down a big hill, and scoring candy at the kind of neighborhood where the neighbors actually leave the lights on and don’t pretend not to be home.

But something is waiting for him in the graveyard.

Is it the ghost of Jake’s dead brother?

A creepy horror tale about what finds us when we’re vulnerable, on Halloween.

Trick or Treat

Jake stood at the edge of the junkyard, dressed as a soldier and holding a fake rifle on a strap over his shoulder. The rifle had an orange tip in case anyone was stupid enough to think it was real. The sun had set and the dark sky was covered in low clouds, turned orange from the streetlights. Lone flakes of snow descended here and there. Did that really count as “snowing” or not? The air smelled like rust. A ton of sirens were going off on the far side of the junkyard, more of them every second, like they were headed toward a fire or a big accident.

This morning—Halloween—he’d decided to cut through the junkyard on his way to go trick-or-treating at the bottom of Cliff Avenue. Now he wasn’t sure.

Stuff had changed at the junkyard since the last time he had been there.

The fence had a new line of barbed wire at the top, one that hadn’t been there before, and there was a new sign up on the fence.

Beware of dog.

Jake had cut through the junkyard once before with his older brother Dave, when he was ten. But that was two years ago.

Last year Dave had graduated early, joined the Army and gone to Afghanistan. And then in September he had died from some stupid homemade bomb buried under the road. Mom had told the Government to cremate Dave’s ashes. They were in a memorial building that looked like a post office, with Dave’s name on a brass plate.

Nobody was okay at Jake’s house. Not Jake, who was always in trouble at school, and not his mom, who was an EMT and had a pretty good excuse, and not his older sister Amy, who was fourteen and just plain mean anyway.

Tonight she had yelled at him that he was too old to go trick-or-treating, and he had to stay home and pass out candy so she could hang out with her friends.

He had screamed back at her that she didn’t have friends and run out the front door, slamming it behind him.

Then realized he had forgotten his trick or treat bag.

He wasn’t going back. And he wasn’t going trick-or-treating in his own neighborhood, either. Too many people who locked their doors and turned off all their lights, except for the TV flickering in the living room.

A mocking voice seemed to whisper in his ear:

What’s the matter, Jake?

Chicken?

Before Jake could think too much about it, he threw his fake rifle over the fence.

It turned around and around through the air, the orange tip flashing under the streetlight, and crashed on top of a car before skidding out of sight.

No alarms went off, no dogs barked.

He was going in.

Read more at books2read.com/tenebrosities-trick-or-treat.

A Leap Back in Time: Interview with Lisa Silverthorne

When I asked my da how ye knew which was the right woman, he told me when the time came, I’d have no doubt. And I didn’t. When I woke in the dark under that tree on the road to Leoch, with you sitting on my chest, cursing me for bleeding to death, I said to myself ‘Jamie Fraser, for all ye canna see what she looks like, and for all she weights as much as a good draft horse, this is the woman.? Diana Gabaldon

Welcome to the Big Time StoryBundle, where you can find ten books on time travel and all things weird and timey wimey. Pay $5 for four ebooks, or a minimum of $15 to unlock all 10 ebooks. Once you purchase, you will be sent download links for your ebooks. More info about this StoryBundle is here.

This StoryBundle helps send money toward the Oregon Food Bank, which has been hit particularly hard due to the Oregon wildfires in the area, as well as the increased need from COVID-19.

But unless you’re a time traveler, don’t wait! Because from time to time…it’s a good time to save on ebooks!

A Leap Back in Time: Interview with Lisa Silverthorne

Lisa Silverthorne is a prolific short story writer, with over a hundred of her stories published across multiple genres. We’re lucky to have her new novella exclusive to our StoryBundle! She is also included in the Fiction River Presents: Time Travelers collection!

1. Tell us about your book. What’s it about, and how does time travel or other timey wimey weirdness fit into your book?

Hi DeAnna, my time-travel novella is about a lonely ghost hunter, Jackson Mayfield, who is obsessed with the strange portrait of a beautiful opera star that leaped to her death in 1896 and the local Port Townsend, WA, legend about a portal in the old, abandoned opera house. According to the legend, a portal will open for forty-eight hours, until leap day ends.

Jackson and his ghost hunting group test out the legend, and he steps back in time to meet this mysterious opera star. Never expecting to fall in love.

But the abandoned opera house holds secrets. And protects those willing to do anything to keep them. Until Jackson challenges them all—to save the woman he loves.

This novella is the first of three novellas I’m calling the Haunted Portraits series. Beauty: Captured and Framed is the first one, followed by Monster: Loose and Unhinged and Harmony: Recaptured and Under Glass.

My story in Fiction River Presents: Time Travelers is called “Christmas, Interrupted.” This novelette is the story of a young woman’s tragically missed love connection that turns ghostly when a lost cat shows up at her apartment and helps her go back in time to try and stop a Christmas murder.

2. What is one of your favorite time-related works? (Fiction, non-fiction, games, etc. all count!)

Gotta go with a couple of classics and a couple of moderns: The Time Machine by H. G. Wells (in the literal sense) and Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury (in the figurative sense) started it all for me. And for modern books: Doomsday Book by Connie Willis (in the literal sense) was amazing like most of Connie Willis’ novels. But Passage by Connie Willis (in the figurative sense) just blew me away. Dandelion Wine and Passage are probably my two favorite books in the whole world. And if I could only take three books with me in that time machine, two of them would be Dandelion Wine and Passage. The third one would be a reference book.

3. What is one of your favorite songs featuring time? Or, if you used a theme song/playlist for your work, what was it?

One of my favorite time travel movies is The Lakehouse. The soundtrack for this movie has some great music on it and I’ve listened to it many times while writing. Not for this particular novella. I love listening to atmospheric music when I write, so when I wrote both of these stories, I listened to music by October Project, Enya, Grey Eye Glances, 2002, and the CD Victorialand by The Cocteau Twins.

ABOUT LISA:

Lisa Silverthorne has published over a hundred short stories in the fantasy, science fiction, romance, and mystery genres. Her short fiction has appeared in dozens of professional publications including: DAW Books, Roc Books, Prime Books, Pulphouse Magazine, and WMG Publishing.Lisa’s novels and many of her shorter works are available online. For more information, please visit lisasilverthorne.com.

YOU CAN FIND HER AT:

lisasilverthorne.com

Leap via hyperlink portal to find Lisa Silverthorne’s Beauty: Captured and Framed and other tales at StoryBundle!

Beyond Space and Time: Interview with DeAnna Knippling

A wanderer in darkness, she followed an eccentric orbit, each new disturbance angling her closer to some long-awaited rendezvous. She could only hope that when the moment came, she’d be wise enough to know it, and brave enough to act.–Matt Ruff

Welcome to the Big Time StoryBundle, where you can find ten books on time travel and all things weird and timey wimey. Pay $5 for four ebooks, or a minimum of $15 to unlock all 10 ebooks. Once you purchase, you will be sent download links for your ebooks. More info about this StoryBundle is here.

This StoryBundle helps send money toward the Oregon Food Bank, which has been hit particularly hard due to the Oregon wildfires in the area, as well as the increased need from COVID-19.

But unless you’re a time traveler, don’t wait! Because a stitch in time…saves on ten excellent ebooks!

Beyond Space and Time: An Interview with DeAnna Knippling

DeAnna Knippling is me 🙂 I almost forgot to post my own interview!

1. Tell us about your book. What’s it about, and how does time travel or other timey wimey weirdness fit into your book?

The House Without a Summer is my version of how a collapse of space and time might work, or not work, in a multiverse. It’s what happens when the wealthiest man in all of Britain decides he’s going to cordon off his own private bubble in time, damn the cost, and might be a little influenced by certain recent events. 1816 really didn’t have a summer; a volcanic eruption of Mount Tambora the previous year dumped so much volcanic ash in the skies that the entire world suffered.

2. What is one of your favorite time-related works? (Fiction, non-fiction, games, etc. all count!)

My favorite is the Bioshock series, particularly Bioshock Infinite.

There’s always a lighthouse. There’s always a man. There’s always a city.

3. What is one of your favorite songs featuring time? Or, if you used a theme song/playlist for your work, what was it?

I normally have a playlist, that is, a list of multiple songs. But this entire book was writte to one song, “Cascade,” by Peter Murphy.

My favorite song about time, though, is “Time in a Bottle,” by Jim Croce.

ABOUT DEANNA:

DeAnna Knippling has a browser history full of murder, gore, and Victorian street maps. She has ambitions to have that house, the one where people laugh nervously and say, “It’s not real, is it?” and spread rumors of a secret room in the basement. She loves crows, cheese, chokecherry jam, and hot sauce, but not all at once. She has been published in Black Static, Three-Lobed Burning Eye, AliterateCrossed GenresCast Macabre, The Fog HornPenumbraBig PulpHorror Without Victims, and more. You can find her in Colorado, on her website at WonderlandPress.com, or on Facebook.

YOU CAN FIND HER AT:

wonderlandpress.com

Give space and time a shake with DeAnna Knippling’s The House Without a Summer and other tales at StoryBundle!

In Search of Lost Time: Interview with Kristine Kathryn Rusch

But sometimes illumination comes to our rescue at the very moment when all seems lost; we have knocked at every door and they open on nothing until, at last, we stumble unconsciously against the only one through which we can enter the kingdom we have sought in vain a hundred years – and it opens.–Marcel Proust

Welcome to the Big Time StoryBundle, where you can find ten books on time travel and all things weird and timey wimey. Pay $5 for four ebooks, or a minimum of $15 to unlock all 10 ebooks. Once you purchase, you will be sent download links for your ebooks. More info about this StoryBundle is here.

This StoryBundle helps send money toward the Oregon Food Bank, which has been hit particularly hard due to the Oregon wildfires in the area, as well as the increased need from COVID-19.

But unless you’re a time traveler, don’t wait! Because if you miss your chance to get these books at such a bargain price, you’ll discover that lost time…really is money!

In Search of Lost Time: Interview with Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Kristine Kathryn Rusch is a prolific author, editor, and teacher working under several pen names. I like her romances best. Wickedly Charming by Kristine Grayson (in other words, Kris) and Assassins in Love by Kris DeLake (also Kris) are my current favorites.

1. Tell us about your book. What’s it about, and how does time travel or other timey wimey weirdness fit into your book?

My book, The Renegat, is a standalone in my Diving Universe. When ships in the Fleet (in that universe) use their anacapa drive, things can go wrong. Sometimes they lose an hour, sometimes a day, sometimes a year. In the regular Diving universe, one of my heroes lost 5,000 years. The Renegat, a ship, is heading on a long anacapa trip, and they might lose more than years. They might lose everything.

2. What is one of your favorite time-related works? (Fiction, non-fiction, games, etc. all count!)

Favorite time-related work. Hmmm. I don’t have favorites, really, although I’m very fond of Back to the Future. Right now, my go-to time travel series mixes time travel, regency romance, and forensic crime fiction. (Not kidding) It’s Julie McElwain’s “in time” series. The latest is Shadows in Time, but start with Murder in Time. These books are fun. (The first chapter of the first book is a bit nuts, but go with it.)

3. What is one of your favorite songs featuring time? Or, if you used a theme song/playlist for your work, what was it?

Again, I don’t do favorites but I have several major playlists for running. By major, I mean days’ long. I switch them out, and once in a while, I hit Clint Black’s “No Time To Kill” which includes this idea–if we knew years ago that today will occur, would we change it? Would we do something? Would we spend “tomorrow’s yesterdays”? And each time I hear it–which is many times since the song first appeared years ago–I am thankful that I didn’t know what was ahead. But I contemplate it every time I hear the song.

ABOUT KRIS:

New York Times and USA Today bestselling writer, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, has written more books than she can count. She’s currently finishing a long sequence of novels in her Diving series. Her Retrieval Artist series has been optioned for television, and her Kris Nelscott mysteries are also under option. She writes science fiction, fantasy, mystery, romance, nonfiction and anything else she can think of. Find more at kriswrites.com.

YOU CAN FIND HER AT:

kriswrites.com

Search for what has gone missing with Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s The Renegat and other tales at StoryBundle!

Timelines are Like a Box of Chocolates: Interview with Stefon Mears

People like us, who believe in physics, know that the distinction between past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.–Albert Einstein

Welcome to the Big Time StoryBundle, where you can find ten books on time travel and all things weird and timey wimey. Pay $5 for four ebooks, or a minimum of $15 to unlock all 10 ebooks. Once you purchase, you will be sent download links for your ebooks. More info about this StoryBundle is here.

This StoryBundle helps send money toward the Oregon Food Bank, which has been hit particularly hard due to the Oregon wildfires in the area, as well as the increased need from COVID-19.

But unless you’re a time traveler, don’t wait! Because you’ll have…the time of your life!

Time is Like a Box of Chocolates: Interview with Stefon Mears

Stefon Mears writes magical tales that operate at 45 degrees off reality–and never quite the same way twice. He may or may not be a time-traveling, musically-inclined pool shark.

1. Tell us about your book. What’s it about, and how does time travel or other timey wimey weirdness fit into your book?

Twisted Timelines is a short story collection. Every story tweaks or messes with time in some way, and no two of them are quite the same in their approach, or their use of time.

2. What is one of your favorite time-related works? (Fiction, non-fiction, games, etc. all count!)

I have so many that it’s hard to call one out. For example, one of my current favorite roleplaying games, Blades in the Dark, has a flashback mechanic that allows characters to solve a current problem retroactively, if the players can narrate it well. I have to say, though, that time travel plays a small but crucial role in one of my favorite television shows of all time, Babylon 5.

3. What is one of your favorite songs featuring time? Or, if you used a theme song/playlist for your work, what was it?

I don’t really use theme songs or playlists for most of my writing, but my favorite time-related song is “Caught Somewhere in Time” by Iron Maiden.

ABOUT STEFON:

Stefon Mears earned his M.F.A. in Creative Writing from N.I.L.A., and his B.A. in Religious Studies (double emphasis in Ritual and Mythology) from U.C. Berkeley. Stefon’s short pieces have sold to magazines such as Fireside and Strange Horizons and anthologies edited by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Kevin J. Anderson, Denise Little, Kerrie L. Hughes, and John Helfers. He has published more than thirty books to date, including the Rise of Magic series. Look for him online at http://www.stefonmears.com, on Facebook, or @stefonmears on Twitter. Sign up for his newsletter at  stefonmears.com/join

YOU CAN FIND HIM AT:

stefonmears.com

Nibble your way through Stefon’s short story collection Twisted Timelines and other tales at StoryBundle!

A Spacetime Mystery: Interview with Ryan M. Williams

Evelyn: Look, I… I may not be an explorer, or an adventurer, or a treasure-seeker, or a gunfighter, Mr. O’Connell, but I am proud of what I am.
RickAnd what is that?
Evelyn: I… am a librarian.The Mummy (1999)

Welcome to the Big Time StoryBundle, where you can find ten books on time travel and all things weird and timey wimey. Pay $5 for four ebooks, or a minimum of $15 to unlock all 10 ebooks. Once you purchase, you will be sent download links for your ebooks. More info about this StoryBundle is here.

This StoryBundle helps send money toward the Oregon Food Bank, which has been hit particularly hard due to the Oregon wildfires in the area, as well as the increased need from COVID-19.

But unless you’re a time traveler, don’t wait! Because you don’t want to have to say…you lost track of time!

A Spacetime Mystery: Interview with Ryan M. Williams

Ryan M. Williams writes some of the most elegantly weird fiction I’ve ever had the pleasure of editing. He also works as a librarian! My hero 🙂

1. Tell us about your book. What’s it about, and how does time travel or other timey wimey weirdness fit into your book?

It’s a mystery in space. Brock’s lover and partner, Muriel, is lost in his past a hundred years ago with their alien intern. There’s a missing alien artifact, trying not to change the past, discover the reason behind all of this, and the fate of the whole galaxy is at stake. I think it’s a lot of fun!

2. What is one of your favorite time-related works? (Fiction, non-fiction, games, etc. all count!)

One? That’s so hard, but really, it’d have to be Dorctor Who. If I could go back in time and pick another, I’d choose Connie Willis’s time-traveling historians.

3. What is one of your favorite songs featuring time? Or, if you used a theme song/playlist for your work, what was it?

Out of Time” by the Divinyls.

ABOUT RYAN:

  • Librarian who writes
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • Horror and Mystery

YOU CAN FIND HIM AT:

Investigate spacetime mysteries with Ryan M. Williams’s Past Lives and other tales at StoryBundle!

The Alternate Universe Tango: Interview with Michael W. Lucas

Time could bifurcate, like a pair of trousers. You could end up in the wrong leg, living a life that was actually happening in the other leg, talking to people who weren’t in your leg, walking into walls that weren’t there anymore. Life could be horrible in the wrong trouser of Time.–Terry Pratchett

Welcome to the Big Time StoryBundle, where you can find ten books on time travel and all things weird and timey wimey. Pay $5 for four ebooks, or a minimum of $15 to unlock all 10 ebooks. Once you purchase, you will be sent download links for your ebooks. More info about this StoryBundle is here.

This StoryBundle helps send money toward the Oregon Food Bank, which has been hit particularly hard due to the Oregon wildfires in the area, as well as the increased need from COVID-19.

But unless you’re a time traveler, don’t wait! Because this deal will come to an end…in a matter of time!

Alternate Universe Tango: Michael W Lucas's Hydrogen Sleets

Michael W. Lucas has adorable pet rats and has written one of my favorite business books for creative types, Cash Flow for Creators. These two facts may or may not be connected.

1. Tell us about your book. What’s it about, and how does time travel or other timey wimey weirdness fit into your book?

The Montague Portal tales are about a future where humanity hasn’t been able to colonize space, but has found a way to travel to alternate universes with different physical laws. Perhaps there’s no law of gravity, or you don’t age, or it looks like ours but genes are contagious. Hydrogen Sleets takes us to a universe that’s much like ours, but right after the Big Bang. Humanity has built a space station to study how the first stars were formed. It’s an empty universe, what could possibly go wrong?

The answer is, of course: everything.

2. What is one of your favorite time-related works? (Fiction, non-fiction, games, etc. all count!)

Oh, that’s a hard question. There are so many good ones to choose from!

I’d have to go with Doctor Who. There’s a certain glee to saying “we’re going to have lunch in eighteenth-century Moscow, and then we’ll visit the Borgias!” The DW storytellers, both old and new, have a blissful fecklessness for any rules of time travel, twisting them to suit the current story, that I find delightful. You need it to work this way? Okay, that’s what we do this episode.

3. What is one of your favorite songs featuring time? Or, if you used a theme song/playlist for your work, what was it?

I enjoy music that gives me a sense of far distant times. Blue Oyster Cult is really good at that, with songs like “Black Blade” and “Veteran of the Psychic Wars.”

ABOUT MICHAEL:

Michael W Lucas is the author of a few dozen books, and has more on the way. His most popular novels include the cozy mystery git commit murder and the thrillers Butterfly Stomp Waltz and Terrapin Sky Tango.

YOU CAN FIND HIM AT:

mwl.io

Take a dip into another universe with Michael W. Lucas’s Hydrogen Sleets and other tales at StoryBundle!

Time Travel to the Past: Interview with Dean Wesley Smith

Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.–Douglas Adams

Welcome to the Big Time StoryBundle, where you can find ten books on time travel and all things weird and timey wimey. Pay $5 for four ebooks, or a minimum of $15 to unlock all 10 ebooks. Once you purchase, you will be sent download links for your ebooks. More info about this StoryBundle is here.

This StoryBundle helps send money toward the Oregon Food Bank, which has been hit particularly hard due to the Oregon wildfires in the area, as well as the increased need from COVID-19.

But unless you’re a time traveler, don’t wait! Because time…is running out!

Time travel to the past with Warm Springs: A Thunder Mountain Novel

Dean Wesley Smith is the author of seventy bajillion novels, even more short stories, teaches excellent classes at WMG Workshops, edits a magazine (Pulphouse), co-edits an anthology series (Fiction River), and a lot more.

I asked him a few questions about time. I would have asked him more, but I think he’s busy 🙂

1. Tell us about your book. What’s it about, and how does time travel or other timey wimey weirdness fit into your book?

My book is in my Thunder Mountain series, where time travel back to around 1900 is the core of every book. In this book they use the idea of alternate universes in time travel to change an event. It is by far my most ambitious time travel novel to date.

2. What is one of your favorite time-related works? (Fiction, non-fiction, games, etc. all count!)

The Somewhere in Time movie is one of my favorites. Christopher Reeve was wonderful and I like the time period as well. 

ABOUT DEAN:

Considered one of the most prolific writers working in modern fiction, New York Times and USA Today bestselling writer Dean Wesley Smith published far over two hundred novels in forty years, and hundreds and hundreds of short stories and non-fiction books. He has over twenty-three million copies of his books in print.

YOU CAN FIND HIM AT:

www.deanwesleysmith.com

Time travel to the past with Dean Wesley Smith’s Warm Springs and other tales at StoryBundle!

Time Travel Stories, No Spaceship Required

Covers from the Big Time Bundle

Welcome to the Big Time Storybundle, home of time travel stories and other wibbly wobbly timey wimey weirdness.

Throw down a minimum of $5 US (or your local equivalent) and take home four books, including mine (The House Without a Summer). Increase your pledge to $15 in order to abscond with all ten books.

These future sci fi and fantasy classics were written by as fine a collection of huge nerds as I have had the pleasure to encounter (in this timeline at least).

We may not be able to make it possible to travel through time (forward, backward, or sideways). We maaaay not be able to shift you into an alternate dimension where current events are a little easier on your blood pressure. And we certainly never promised you a time machine.

But any of these books can definitely help you escape from the present moment!

Click here to take off 🙂

P.S. My story is The Year Without a Summer, a gothic horror novel that isn’t quite part of the Cthulhu mythos, but was written in part to play with Lovecraftian tropes taken to some logical conclusions. Goodbye, ordinary space-time.

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